You Are Wanted, You Are Loved

Adult adoptee Ying Lamb, now 22, shares her advice for children who come home at older ages, and for the families who adopt them. 

Living in China, as a 13-year-old orphan about to be adopted, was a difficult feeling. My whole life — the hard times, and the good times — were about to be left behind. In China, children in orphanages are often looked down on, and not treated with full human respect, so I did want a family, and a chance to have a different life. My life had not been all bad, though, and it is terrifying looking into a future with everything unknown.

And my life so far had been full of many disappointments, so what if this was no different? Continue reading “You Are Wanted, You Are Loved”

A Serendipitous Reunion

Through social media and the movie “Lion,” Holt adoptee Phillip Sais reunites with the woman who escorted him from India to his family in the U.S. when he was just 19 months old. 

Phillip and Char during a visit to the Holt headquarters office in Eugene, Oregon, July 2017.

It was the day after New Years when a mysterious Facebook message appeared on Phillip Sais’ phone.

“I was just sitting around doing my usual thing, thinking about classes or what do I have to do for work, and I get this message on my phone,” recalls the 20-year-old college student. “It’s like, ‘Phillip … you have grown up to be such a lovely young man, you know, since I saw you at 19 months old.’”

Immediately, Phillip sprung to action. There was only one person to call.

“Mom,” he said when she picked up, “who was the person who brought me from India?’” Continue reading “A Serendipitous Reunion”

This Could Have Been Me

After years of curiosity, 26-year-old Indian adoptee Shabana Deckinga travels to the country of her birth — bringing unexpected healing, and putting some long-held fears to rest.

Shabana poses for a picture with staff members at BSSK, the orphanage in Pune where she lived before coming home to her family.

I set out on the trip back to India 24 years after my adoption. I was 2 and a half years old when I was adopted and at 26, my family and I made the long, 8,500-mile journey back. As I told my mom during the trip, it did not feel like a vacation, but rather a pilgrimage to my birthplace. Although I had no memories of India or the orphanage, I had grown up with stories – my parents wanting me to be aware of my heritage. So I really had no idea what to expect going back, having only a romanticized view from books I had read. There was a lot of anxiety, unease and excitement leading up to the trip, and some old fears from childhood resurfaced.

I was not another tourist there and did not experience India with that mindset. Continue reading “This Could Have Been Me”

Saying Thank You in Korean

While traveling on Holt’s 2012 Adult Adoptee Heritage Tour of Korea, Kim Buckley met the foster family that cared for her before joining her family in the U.S. This piece originally appeared in The Daily Nebraskan, the daily newspaper of The University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Kim with her foster mom and her foster sister, who also helped care for Kim while she was waiting to join her adoptive family in the U.S.

I found out why there is a stereotype of Asians being bad drivers during a trip to South Korea this summer. As it turns out, narrow streets and speeders make for impatient drivers who narrowly avoid accidents.

But that wasn’t the only thing I discovered in Korea. Continue reading “Saying Thank You in Korean”

A Meeting that Changed My Life

In a post originally on their blog, We the Lees, Lee Fritz shares about he and his wife’s trip to Korea, and the unforgettable afternoon he spent with Molly Holt. 

Exactly one year ago, I had the distinct opportunity of meeting a woman whose life work was dedicated to helping orphans and abandoned children – a work that has had a direct impact on my life. She has always put the needs of others ahead of her own and is such an inspiration. There were probably times when she struggled to keep going and was under so much pressure that it would have been easier to quit and do something else. She, of course, did not quit, but continued building an organization that has helped thousands of children around the world. Her name is Molly Holt.

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Continue reading “A Meeting that Changed My Life”

Tobin and I

Knox Beard writes what he loves about — and what he’s learned from — his little brother, Tobin, who has autism. This post originally appeared on Anna-Marie and Brian Beard’s blog, pursuingtob.com

Our eight-year-old, Knox, is an “old soul.” There is just a knowing that he has… like he can feel people and situations. He’s still an eight-year-old, full of laughter and fun and light, and he still makes mistakes… he’s not perfect but he is so Good. He’s been through heavy himself, and heavy with us, and he just seems to understand. He “gets it.” Continue reading “Tobin and I”

We Need Families for Children With Down Syndrome

Across China, many children with Down syndrome are waiting for loving adoptive families. Recently, our orphanage partners sent us files for 16 children with Down syndrome, ages 10 months to 3 years old — each precious, each in need of a family to bring them home.
Mindy and Alaina a few days after her Gotcha Day.

Across China, many children with Down syndrome are waiting for loving adoptive families. Recently, our orphanage partners asked for help to find families for 16 children with Down syndrome, ages 10 months to 3 years old — each precious, each in need of a family to bring them home. There are Special Blessings grants available for the adoption of these children!

What is it like to raise a child who has Down syndrome?

Jason and Ryan brought their 2-year-old son, Joe, home from China in March.

“As parents, we knew that no amount of reading and research would completely prepare us for parenting any child, one with Down syndrome included,” Ryan tells us. Continue reading “We Need Families for Children With Down Syndrome”