Vivian Needs a Family

Happy 5th Birthday, Vivian! Born five years ago on February 20, Vivian came into care at just two days old — a weak and premature baby, cold to the touch. My, how times have changed! Read More

adoption-pathway-feb-KoreaBoy

Adopt from Korea!

• Children waiting for families are younger with minor special needs
• The children live in a very good foster home while they wait for an adoptive family
• Excellent medical information is available about the children
• The program is very stable and predictable

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adoption-pathway-feb-ChinaGirl

Adopt from China!

• Open to single and married applicants
• Families can request a child of a specific gender
• The process takes on average 12-30 months
• Most children have moderate to major special needs or are older

Request more information!

 

 

Interested in learning more about all of our adoption programs? Click here!

 

As 16-year-old Van Dai prepares to meet his adoptive family, and his adoptive family prepares to meet him, they share what they’re nervous about, what they’re excited about, and why they are so eager to finally meet one another.

­­­­Van Dai is 16 years old. He likes math, soccer and computer games, and is naturally good at things that require problem solving and forethought. He’s a bit shy and introspective, and doesn’t show a broad range of emotion. But when you catch his eye and smile, he will return your smile a thousand-fold. His smile is absolutely radiant.

It’s a hot and humid January afternoon in the south of Vietnam, but cooler where we sit inside on wooden furniture, beneath a blowing fan. In the background, we can hear the sounds of children playing, the occasional squeak of metal swings.

“How are you feeling right now?”

Van Dai’s eyes gleam and glance around the room. He smiles.

“’I’m so happy to meet my parents,” he says. “I’ve been waiting for this for so long.” Read More

Holt’s feeding specialists have traveled the world training caregivers in nutrition and feeding best practices — and sometimes, something as simple as a spoon can make all the difference.

Several months had passed since the Holt Nutrition Program team’s last trip to Ethiopia — to help lead a nutrition training at Sele Enat orphanage. And now, Rae Miller, an occupational therapist who specializes in feeding — a skill particularly helpful in her work with Holt’s nutrition program — was there to evaluate how things were going. Already, rates of anemia had decreased and children looked healthier — and happier!

But still, one issue stood out: aspiration.

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Jing with her family. She appears center, in her dad’s arms

When Koni and Ken Maat decide to adopt a 3-year-old girl from China with significant medical needs, they are moved by the generosity of others who help them bring her home.

Everything in life was great! Our four biological children were all healthy, successful adults and the youngest was halfway through college. We could go where we wanted, when we wanted, without a thought to childcare or bedtimes. And I was finally able to have a dedicated guest room that I had always wanted in our modest home.

I was excited as I planned, painted and decorated the guest room, imagining the family and out-of-town friends who would stay there. When it was completed, I would periodically open the door and look in. It was the one room in the house that was always perfect and glancing in gave me a sense of peace. The satisfaction was short-lived. It seemed so pointless to have this empty room when there were children without a home. I began to research foster care, domestic adoption and international adoption. I would read waiting children’s bios knowing I could help them. I began frequently mentioning my desire and my findings to my husband, Ken, but was met with silence. On the occasion he did respond, he made it clear that he thought I was crazy for wanting to mess up our clearly perfect lifestyle. Read More