God Has Answered – China Adoption Story

For as long as she can remember, Liz Larson wanted to be a mom. But the China adoption process, by herself, tested her patience and perseverance. It took her more than 7,000 miles. But it also made her lean heavily into God’s promises for herself, for her daughter and for their new life together.

On days when Liz Larson’s journey to her daughter felt overwhelmingly long, she repeated three words to herself like a prayer. God has answered.

And on the morning she meets her daughter, she appears calm, attentive.

“I’m not nervous, really,” Liz says in the expansive marble lobby of the Kempinski Hotel, a favorite among adoptive families bringing home children from Shanxi province. “I’m just ready. I’ve been ready.”

Liz’s daughter is 2-and-a-half and the little Liz knows about her has come from email and photo updates, often translated from Chinese to English with minimal fanfare or specificity.

“According to her paperwork, she’s a shy, slow-to-warm kind of gal. She supposedly likes her doll. I don’t know much. You just get the paperwork and you have to trust it,” Liz says. “When I was waiting for the match, I wondered what she would be like. But then you get the match and you still don’t know what she’s like. You have a picture, but it’s just a picture.”

From Franklin, Tennessee — where Liz lives and works as a child and family counselor — to Taiyuan, China, it’s more than 7,000 miles. But as a single woman, the journey to motherhood — the journey to her daughter — has been more arduous than any physical distance.

It’s a journey that has already brought Liz to China once before. Continue reading “God Has Answered – China Adoption Story”

MYTH: You have to be married to adopt.

Week-3-NAM-You-Have-to-be-Married

So many children are growing up around the world without the love and care of a family. And so many hopeful parents — singles and couples — are waiting with love to give. At Holt, our mission is to bring you together — regardless of your marital status.

“A lot of single applicants are concerned about their ability to adopt,” says Emily Lund, who as Holt’s primary adoption counselor often fields questions from hopeful adoptive parents. “The good news is that many of our country programs permit single applicants to adopt.”

In fact, four of Holt’s country programs are now open to single female applicants!

Since 2011, when China re-opened adoptions to single applicants, we have seen a steady increase in the number of women adopting a child on their own. Holt’s Philippines program also accepts single applicants on a case-by-case basis for older children or children with moderate to major special needs or for a relative adoption. The India program accepts single applicants, and is the only one of Holt’s country programs open to single male applicants. And last year, options for singles expanded once again when Vietnam re-opened international adoption to the U.S. and selected Holt as one of two placing agencies. Now, single female applicants open to an older child or a child with special needs can adopt from Vietnam!

Although not every single mother is equipped to care for a child with involved needs, many would make excellent parents to a child with more minor needs… And recently, China expanded options for single applicants yet again by lifting the special focus requirement. This means that Holt’s China program now matches single mothers with children who are younger or have more minor or moderate special medical needs! Continue reading “MYTH: You have to be married to adopt.”