Have you considered adopting from Vietnam?

Last September, we received the exciting news that Holt was chosen as one of two agencies in the U.S. to participate in a pilot adoption program for children with special needs in Vietnam!

With this announcement, a 6-year moratorium on adoptions from Vietnam to the U.S. came to an official end. In the past few months, we have begun searching for families to adopt through our newest program.

Today, Holt continues our search for a limited number of families interested in adopting a child from Vietnam. As the children who need families from Vietnam have more moderate to severe special needs — like vision or hearing impairments, limb difference or a complicated birth history — are 5 years or older, or are part of a sibling group, finding the right families for them can be a challenge.

No matter the challenge, however, we remain dedicated to the words of our founder, Harry Holt.

After years of serving war orphans in Korea — many of them children of mixed race with physical, emotional or developmental special needs — Harry Holt reached a very simple truth.

Every child is worthy. Every child is beautiful. Every child deserves to feel the unconditional, unstoppable love of a family.

Finding families for children with special needs brings us tremendous joy. Time and time again, we see children who were once considered “hard to place” now thriving in families. And we are proud to stand by adoptive families for life, offering support, resources and more.

The children waiting for families in Vietnam are children like beautiful Demitiria.

Born premature, weighing less than 2 pounds, tiny Demitria is a fighter. She was abandoned shortly after birth, and nearly died from pneumonia. Still a baby, she was diagnosed with a heart condition. Doctors also discovered that she is blind. Malnourished, with stunted growth and developmental delays, she entered a care center dedicated to providing the highest level of care possible.

Surrounded with love and nurturing attention, nearly 2-year-old Demitria’s joyful personality now shines through. She laughs out loud when she plays with her caregivers. She’s learned to pull herself to a standing position, and she enjoys being snuggled and held.

Demitiria will need a family who can provide her with excellent medical resources.

Currently, we anticipate that the time frame to adopt from Vietnam is 24 to 36 months, from application to home. Couples who have been married for two years and are 25 to 50 years old with less than four children in the home are eligible to adopt from Vietnam. Families falling outside of eligibility criteria will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

As one of the two U.S. agencies approved to facilitate international adoption from Vietnam — a country where we have long served children and families — Holt is excited to once again unite loving adoptive families in the U.S. with the children from Vietnam who truly need them.

If you are interested in learning more about Demitira, our adoption program in Vietnam, or other children waiting for families, please contact Danielle Peebles at daniellep@holtinternational.org.

2 Comments on “Have you considered adopting from Vietnam?

  1. Hello Danielle,

    I was hoping you can help me or direct me to someone who might know about the process of adopting from Vietnam. I have a cousin who recently lost her husband in a car accident. She has two little girls and another baby on the way. I would like very much to adopt the two little girls. Do you know if that is possible? And can it be done?

    Sincerely,
    Lynh Jones

  2. Hi Lynh,

    Our Vietnam adoption program does help with family adoptions from Vietnam to the United States. Please call us at 541-687-2202 and ask to speak to a Vietnam adoption counselor or email Danielle Peebles at DanielleP@HoltInternational.org. We should be able to discuss initial eligibility with you.

    Best of luck and prayers of peace to you and your family during this time.

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